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The CLOTH and STONE TOUR to INDIA will take place in the state of Gujarat at ground level in our private vehicle.  That means we can stop at will to enjoy the colour and diverse wonder that is India up close, and enjoy many encounters with locals and wildlife.  Map the tour here >>>

Fellow travellers on the road north, Kachchh.

Fellow travellers on the road north, Kachchh.

The Timeless Varanasi tour begins in the city of Ahmedabad and takes us to Varanasi to immerse ourselves in the history, culture and spirituality of this ancient city.
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Evening Aarti at Dashashwamedh Ghat

Click here to check out some of the sights you might encounter on the tours.

Lunchtime at Shaam-e-sharhad

 

I arrived at Shaam-e-sarhad (Sunset at the Border), a mud-built resort in a village last night just at dinner time, tired and dusty after a day on the road visiting villages, artisans and points of interest on the way from Bhuj. After dinner, accompanied by village musicians drumming, singing and dancing, I retire early without a bath as the hot water will not arrive until the morning and the warmth of the late winter day is giving way to the cold of a desert night.

I slept well on the hard bed, had a deliciously hot bucket bath, sat catching up on blog articles in the common area near the open-sided dining hall, and now it is lunchtime. Continue reading

Village resort and the pastoralists of the Banni

I am staying in a mud-built resort – an initiative of and located in the village of Hodka in northwestern Gujarat, not far from the famous White Desert or Rann of Kachchh.

My tent at the mud resort at Hodka village

My tent at the mud resort at Hodka village

Meals are taken in the large open-air pavilion with grass roof and ceiling of colourful fabric. The central food station is attended by a group of lovely young men from the village. They are really friendly and I try to remember their names. In the tourist season they work here, then in off-season (summer – when it is way too hot for tourists) there are other jobs to do.

The guys ready to serve dinner. From left: Natha, Maya Valji, Manish and Gayani

Natha is from a family who do mud work and wall painting.  Mani is 16 years old and the lowest in the pecking order here, doing general cleaning work and food serving. He has the biggest whitest smile always ready to light up his brown face, and tries to please all the time.  Valji is one of the serving staff. He is a member of the family who do all the resort’s mud and mirror work for which this region is famous. They also make the wattle and daub fences and paint the walls with traditional designs. In the off-season, he goes to Mumbai and Delhi and works on mud-work commissions and he is planning on creating a bird sanctuary nearby.

Once I have shown an interest in a few of the guys, spruiking my few sentences of Hindi, asking names, what their roles are etc., the others also want to tell their stories and I realize that it is my genuine interest in them that is the main difference between me and a visiting Indian family who treat them as staff only and as such, do not take an interest. That is the difference between a society built on class and caste and the Australian egalitarian style. The side benefit for me, of course, is that I get extremely good service and attention from these lovely guys, and after less than one day here, they are beginning to anticipate my needs. (Later, when it came time to leave, they lined up to bid me goodbye.)

Valji, who will be married in March after a thirteen year engagement (he and his future wife must have been betrothed as children), sensed my genuine interest in the place and the people and gifted me a book which I find both fascinating and educational. It outlines the biocultural community protocol of the Maldharis of Banni (the pastoralists of the Banni grasslands  in this district in the north of Kachchh, Gujarat). The Maldharis have been the custodians of the biodiversity-rich Banni grassland ecosystem and have protected it and nurtured it for over 450 years.

This is an important document with the agreement between at first the Maharajah Radheshua-ji of Kachcch in the 18th century. There is documentary evidence (reproduced in the book) that the Madlharis have paid pancheri (grazing tax) since old times, in exchange for the right to graze their animals in Banni without any private land allocation or agriculture. It seems to me uncertain that contemporary governments have ratified this protocol and this document is a well researched and produced call to action to continue the historical rights of the Maldharis.

The Protocol in brief:

We believe that nature has entrusted us with the responsibility to protect Banni and the right to practice our traditional way of life in the Banni and through this biocultural community protocol we call on the government to respect and affirm this right.

In Maldharis biocultural community protocol we clearly state who we are, where we live, our relationship to Banni and our animals, our rights to land, our breeds and associated traditional knowledge and our duties to protect this ecosystem.

There are different stories of how these people came to live in the Banni. Here is one account from one of the elders of the Meghwal Hindus:

Our elders have told us that in 1736, and army from Sindh (now in Pakistan) led by Khaloda Mohammad Mir invaded Kachchh . Our ancestors were asked by the Maharajah Radheshua-ji of Kachcch to fight with his armies and defend the land from invaders. Though we lost many lives and suffered much in the ensuing battle, the Maharajah was, with our help, victorious. To reward our loyalty and valour, the Maharajah gave the Maldharis title to the Banni. As we were pastoralists the Maharajah also decreed that the grasslands should not be used for agriculture.

From further reading, I learn that the Maldharis have developed the unique Banni buffalo especially adapted to the grasses of the Banni.

The Maldharis hold their cattle in high regard. Some of us take our shoes off before we enter the place where our animals lie. Historically the measure of a man was based on different animals he kept. A Maldhari who had a good pedigree pure animals and expert in traditional knowledge was known as ‘bhagiya’ – he who is lucky with animals.

They have also developed a unique water harvesting system that enables them to suvive the harsh Kachchh summers. Temporary wells known as ‘virdas’ are built as a community activity by all the men of the village. The shallow wells are built in the place where a water hole has dried up but where ground water is not far below. The well is lined with logs of wood and Banni grasses: the wood prevents the well from collapsing and the grass filters the water.

I also learn that there are 18 Muslim communities and two Hindu in the Banni. There are strong ties between the communities and in solidarity with the Hindu, the Muslims refrain from eating beef. The Muslims provide milk and ghee to the Hindu Meghwals, who in turn provide leather shoes, saddles, water satchels and help building their bhungas (round houses).

The book goes on to list all the grasses of the Banni with images, the various tribal groups, the indigenous livestock and breeding protocols, and even home-grown vetinary treatments and much else. Challenges to their way of life are also catalogued, chief amongst them is poisonous effluent from industry on the fringes of the Banni: buffalo are dying because of poisoned waterholes.  Another threat  is police harassment.

I am finding it fascinating to delve a little deeper in the various cultures of India, and treasure this book and the brief time I have shared with the Maldharis of Kachchh.

Banni pastoralist with his herd

Banni pastoralist with his herd

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Banni buffalo

Village dining in the city

Saturday night was a time to catch up with old friends in Ahmedabad. We decided to dine at the lovely Vishalla – more an experience than a restaurant.

Vishalla is was designed by it’s owner, Mr. Surendra Patel, as a traditional Indian village, remembering the carefree school holidays he spent in the village.  The attention to detail in this village-like environment is constant: there are lanterns as lighting, the entire area is mud-plastered, and the entertainment section uses no modern sound systems. The effect is further enhanced with Continue reading