In stitches

A part of our tour that everyone was really looking forward to, even the non-stitchers amongst us, was the full day workshop at Kala Raksha in a tiny village near Bhuj. Kala Raksha Trust is dedicated to the preservation of traditional arts through several streams:
THE MUSEUM
Founded in 1996, and housed at the campus, makes the collections of historic and contemporary exhibits available for visiting scholars and students of textiles. The collection can also be accessed through the website: http://www.kala-raksha-museum.org/

“Uniquely committed to documenting existing traditions, the Trust maintains a collection of heirloom textiles. This local Museum embodies a simple but revolutionary concept: involve people in presenting their own cultures.”

Some images from the museum collection. Click on the images to enlarge.

KALA RAKSHA VIDHYALAYA

“An institution of design for traditional artisans.
Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya is an initiative of Kala Raksha Trust. In its second decade, Kala Raksha sought to address India’s most pressing need: education. In October 2005, the Trust launched this institution, whose environment, curriculum and methodology are designed for traditional artisans, as a new approach to the rejuvenation of traditional arts.”

Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya (KRV) evolved from years of design development based in the Kala Raksha Museum. KRV is an educational institution open to working artisans of Kutch, conservatively estimated at 50,000. It aims to provide knowledge and skills directly relevant to the artisan’s traditional art to enable market appropriate innovation, while honouring and strengthening the tradition.
As working artisans can rarely leave their homes and profession for long periods, the course is a series of modular classes conducted over one year in a local residential setting, using the vernacular language. The institute focuses on establishing long lasting market links.

Our day at Kala Raksha began with a visit to the  museum display housed in a traditional ‘bhunga’.

A traditional mud built and thatched bhunga.

A traditional mud built and thatched bhunga, decorated, like many of the textiles, with tiny mirrors.

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Detail of the tie-down system on the thatched roof of the bhunga.

Amongst so many things, we learned that within a community’s traditional embroidery technique and design motifs, there is much room for personal expression.  This is particularly important when a young couple are betrothed. As they are not allowed to meet before their wedding day, a series of gifts are exchanged, and a girl will typically send embroidered items to her betrothed and his family. It is through the quality of the embroidery and the motifs used that the groom and his family are able to decipher the qualities and personality of the future bride.

Next we were shown some of the historic collection, stored safely in flat drawers with traditional insect repelling herbs and spices tied in muslin to protect the precious textiles.

Then we joined some of the local ladies who instructed us in the finer points of the various stitches used in the textiles of the various communities of the area. A break for lunch with the ladies, and then several more hours trying to learn the intricacies of the stitches.  In my case, it was not so much learning the stitches, but increasing my awe and respect for the makers of these extraordinary textiles.

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Everyone getting involved with the stitches. From left: Margot, Carol, Pauline and Jill in front with our lovely teachers.

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Jill learns some stitches from one of the Kala Raksha ladies

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Deep concentration from Pauline (left) and Sue (right) as one of the ladies demonstrates her stitching technique.

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One of our very patient tutors.

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And another of our teachers

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Sue learning from her stitching tutor.

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A lot of concentration from both tutor and student, Carol.

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Carol shows off her new stitching skills

Whilst the preservation of tradition is paramount at Kala Raksha, innovation is also taking place. Artisans are telling stories through the technique of appliqué as well as applying their traditional stitching skills to a vast range of wonderful products available for purchase in the on-site shop….. we spent quite a lot of time, and rupees in there!

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One of the narrative appliqué panels showing scenes from the life of Gandhi.

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A detail from another narrative panel about monsoon time.  Note the use of scraps of block printed fabrics.

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Another detail of another panel.

3 thoughts on “In stitches

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